Families and community

Last Updated: 31 Mar 2020 4:46pm

Last update: 08 Apr 2020 2:26pm

New restrictions on gatherings are in place in Tasmania to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in our community.

Tasmanians should stay at home unless they need to be away from home:

  • shopping for supplies or services; or
  • undertaking personal exercise; or
  • attending medical, or health care, appointments or for medical treatment; or
  • providing social support, or care, to another person (including compassionate needs, or to facilitate shared custody, guardianship or care arrangements for another person); or
  • attending school or study, if unable to be performed at the person’s home; or
  • attending work, or volunteering, if unable to be performed at the person’s home; or
  • seeking veterinary services for an animal; or
  • performing essential maintenance, or security inspections, of another premises owned, or occupied, by the person; or
  • attending another location if you have a reasonable excuse, in the opinion of the Director of Public Health or his or her delegate, to attend the location.

New rules apply to indoor and outdoor gatherings, with a rule of two persons to be applied, except for gatherings of household members, those in shared custody, guardianship arrangements or other care arrangements.

This means in the home, only two extra visitors are permitted at any one time. Outside the home, you may be with the people who live in your household, or if leaving the home alone, you may meet one other person to comply with the maximum group size of two people.

Arrangements have been made to ensure that shared parenting arrangements can be complied with, and other necessary arrangements for legal guardians, care givers etc.

There are exemptions to the two person rule, including to allow more than two people in a private vehicle, in passenger transport, on a ferry service or vessel, at a medical, health or veterinary service or residential care facility, for the purpose of emergency services, at permitted businesses (eg supermarkets, pharmacies), at work (except if your venue or service is prohibited) and at school, childcare or educational institution.

It is no longer permitted to use play equipment in public playgrounds and parks. Outside gyms, playgrounds and skate parks in public places are to be closed. Boot camps are limited to two people (the trainer and participant).

The total number of people present at a funeral must not exceed 10 persons. This includes mourners and officiators. An infant, regardless of age, is a person to be included in the head count permitted at funerals. There is no exemption for additional family members to attend under exceptional circumstances.

Where safe and practicable, each person at a funeral must maintain a distance of no less than 1.5 metres between themselves and any other person, and the total number of persons present in any single undivided space, at the same time, must not exceed the one person per four square metre rule.

See Gatherings FAQs for more information.

Vulnerable Tasmanians

It is also recommended that Indigenous people over the age of 50; people over the age of 65 with existing health conditions or co-morbidities; and anyone over the age of 70 should stay at home as much as possible to protect their health.

This does not mean that they are unable to leave home for essential services or supplies, or to visit loved ones for social support and connection.

But members of these high risk groups should take extra precautions to avoid unwell visitors, including unwell children that might not fully understand social distancing boundaries.

Movement between residences

People with more than one residence in Tasmania (eg shack owners) need to base themselves in their primary residence for the next four weeks from 11.59 pm Monday 30 March 2020, unless there is a need for a household member to self-isolate in the primary residence (in that case the second residence is appropriate to use to separate household members), or if urgent repairs, maintenance or a security check needs to be undertaken at the other residence.

Moving house

If you are currently in the process of moving house within Tasmania, a common sense approach will be applied to you leaving your current home for the purpose of moving your belongings to your new home.

Once you have completed moving your belongings and left your previous place of residence, your new house will become your primary residence. You will need to comply with the directions to remain in your primary residence.

Last update: 10 Apr 2020 10:50am

Emergency Alert

You may receive a text message or voice message from the Tasmanian Government regarding COVID-19 and the current rules affecting Tasmanians.

Emergency Alert is one way of sending important information to the public and will not be used in all circumstances. Emergency Alert relies on telecommunications networks to send messages, and message delivery cannot be guaranteed.

What will the warning message say?

The warning message will provide information on the current situation, what action to take and where to find further information.

For further information about Emergency Alert visit: http://www.emergencyalert.gov.au/

Staying at home and public gatherings

Under Tasmania’s Public Health Emergency Declaration an order has been issued that limits the number of people who can gather in public, and places restrictions on the movement of people for non-essential reasons. These measures are necessary to control the spread of coronavirus within the Tasmanian community.

What are the new changes?

Order to stay at home

From midnight Monday, 30 March 2020 Tasmanians must stay at home unless leaving to:

  • shop for essential food and supplies or services.
  • receive medical care
  • for compassionate needs or social support (including facilitating shared custody, guardianship or care arrangements for another person)
  • exercise
  • attend work, volunteering, school and study, where it cannot be done remotely
  • take a pet to a veterinarian
  • perform essential maintenance on another premises owned by them.

Physical distancing measures

To assist with physical distancing, it is now prohibited to gather with more than one other person (from outside your household). This means that, you can still go for a walk or undertake other exercise, walk into work or visit a shop for essential supplies, you cannot do this with more than one other person from outside your household. Only two people may gather together in a group. The only exception to this Direction is for people who are members of the same household – this means that, for example, a family of four is still able to walk down the street together.

The below definitions and FAQs will assist you in understanding what these new measures mean and how they are applicable to daily life.

Leaving home

What are essential supplies and when can I shop for them?

Food and other household supplies, as well as pharmaceutical/medical supplies, items you need for urgent home repairs or maintenance and services, such as getting your vehicle serviced or repaired.

As long as the business is not a prohibited venue or service (more on this below) you may attend the business to shop for the supplies and services.

You may leave your home to get supplies as necessary but you should not go out more than is absolutely necessary. While there is no limit to the number of times you can leave you home to gather essential supplies, it is recommended that you try to limit your essential supplies trips to one trip per week, where possible. This will help keep you and others in the community safe.

What is a prohibited business, venue or service?

Each of the premises listed in Schedule 1 must not open or be operated, eg restaurants, cafes and food courts, with the exception of takeaway whilst the Direction is in force.

Each of the services listed in Schedule 2 must not be provided whilst the Direction is in force.

What is compassionate care/social support?

This includes activities that provide support or care to another person. These people may be:

  • a partner
  • relative
  • close friend
  • a child
  • someone without access to technology
  • someone without a strong social support networks
  • a neighbour
  • an elderly person

In what circumstances may I provide compassionate care/social support?

  • serious illness
  • a death
  • mental health or distress
  • relationship breakdown
  • family violence
  • poor social support, such as people living alone
  • people with chronic illness
  • homeless
  • child at risk
  • facilitate shared parenting arrangements, guardianship or care arrangements for another person.

Whilst undertaking these activities remember to maintain good hygiene and physical distancing. Wash your hands frequently and stay 1.5m from other people where possible.

If you are required to move into someone’s home (or they move into your home) to provide compassionate care during this time, you may do this. Remember to exercise common-sense and limit movements between households to the minimum necessary.

What types of medical care can I access?

You can leave your home for medical appointments.

Whilst you may still access GP appointments, optometrists, dental and other standard health services, be aware that your provider might defer non-urgent appointments. Call them to discuss your circumstances and options. You may be offered telehealth, which means that you can have your consultation by phone or videoconference where it is clinically appropriate.

You can still donate blood, so long as you are well and meet the usual requirements to be a blood donor.

Remember to practice good hygiene and social distancing measures when you are attending medical appointments.

If you require urgent medical assistance, call triple zero (000).

Should I be going to work?

Where possible, you should continue to undertake your employment at your home. For example, office workers should be encouraged to work from home to help with physical distancing measures and limit the contact between people.

If it is not possible for you to work from home, you may continue to attend your workplace as normal. You can travel to work via your usual methods, including public transport. More than two people may be present within shared spaces at your workplace, although physical distancing guidelines should be implemented at every opportunity to help limit close contact.

If you are sick, you must not attend your workplace. You must stay at home and away from others, except to seek medical treatment.

Can my children attend school?

Parents who are able to provide appropriate care for their children at home are encouraged to do so. Public schools have started rolling out learning from home resources and these will be operational when school returns for Term 2. If you can keep you child at home and need to discuss their learning options, their school should be your first point of contact.

Schools are an important place of support for essential service workers and vulnerable families who may continue to send their children to school and will therefore remain open for these families to continue sending their children. For students not attending school, learning will be led by their usual teachers utilising distance education methods.

For Term 1 students will cease attendance as of Friday April 3. Monday 6 April to Thursday 9 April 2020 are student free to enable schools and teachers to complete the professional learning required to finalise the delivery of a home and online model from the beginning of Term 2.

Term 2 will now begin from Tuesday the April 28 for students.

What about child care?

Yes. Children can still attend childcare as required.

Should grandparents be looking after grandchildren?

Tasmania’s elderly population is at a higher-risk. Steps should be taken to protect elderly grandparents from any unwell children. This does not mean grandparents cannot see grandchildren, but extra care should be taken to avoid any contact with someone that is unwell.

If you have alternative care arrangements it would be a good idea to utilise those. Keep up the connection between grandparents and children by making time for phone calls, video chats and other ways to connect in the digital world.

Can I exercise outdoors?

Yes, exercise is encouraged as an important part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The two person rule applies outdoors, except where members of your household are exercising together, or members of a custody or guardianship arrangement are exercising together.

Use common sense whilst exercising outdoors. Keep at least 1.5m from others and make sensible choices about where you go. For example, if you intend to take a walk on your local beach but notice upon arrival that there are already a few other users there, come back at a later time or head to the other end of the beach to start your walk. Ensure you are well away from others and not creating a ‘crowd’ situation.

Can I go surfing?

Yes, you can surf as a form of exercise but remember that the two-person rule applies outdoors, unless it is members of a household, shared parenting or guardianship arrangement exercising together. Social distancing must also be practiced.

Can I take my pet to the vet?

You can continue to take your pet to the vet when required for the wellbeing of your pet.

Can I use public transport?

Yes, to attend school or work, obtain supplies or attend medical appointments. If you are using public transport for any of the reasons permitted under the Direction to stay at home, that is fine.

Non-essential travel is no longer permitted.

Observe social distancing when on public transport and sit in the back seat of taxis and ride share vehicles.

Can I ride my motorbike?

Motorbikes are considered a form of transport and cannot be used for exercise. They can be used only for the reasons outlined in the Order:

  • to shop for essential food and supplies or services;
  • to receive medical care;
  • for compassionate needs or social support (including facilitating shared parenting arrangements, guardianship or care arrangements for another person);
  • to travel to a location to undertake exercise;
  • to attend work, volunteering, school and study, where it cannot be done remotely;
  • to take a pet to a veterinarian; or
  • to perform essential maintenance on another premises you own.

What about families who share custody?

Custody arrangements still need to be managed and adhered to, unless otherwise altered by mutual arrangements/agreements. Children can live at each partner’s home in line with custody arrangements. You are able to pick up and drop off your child as usual to facilitate these arrangements.

Can I go to my shack?

No, you will not be able to go to your shack for school holidays, Easter or at any other time, unless to conduct urgent maintenance or repairs or a day trip security check.

Our shack communities are small, many are the place of choice for our older retired community. Older Tasmanians are more vulnerable if they contract coronavirus. By moving between your house and your shack you are creating risk for communities.

If you are living at your shack as your temporary primary residence – for example, if you are completing a period of self-isolation there, you may remain there but be aware that you are not permitted to move between your shack and another home location. You must remain at your primary residence unless you are going out for the reasons permitted under the Direction to stay at home.

Can I go horse riding/exercise my horse(s)?

Whilst staying at home, it is important you look after our mental health and physical wellbeing. Exercise is encouraged as an important part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, preferably in your local neighbourhood.

The Tasmanian Government is not imposing a ban on floating horses to exercise in local areas. Remember, the two person rule applies to this activity, except if it is members of your household exercising together, or members of a custody or guardianship arrangement, exercising together.

Can I go boating and fishing?

You can go boating and fishing for recreation/exercise in line with looking after your mental wellbeing and undertaking outdoor activities. The two-person rule applies except if you are going boating with persons that you reside with. Members of a custody or guardianship arrangement are also accepted.

You can only launch a boat from within the municipality of your primary residence. You must not travel outside your municipality to launch a boat. This measure is to help prevent the spread of coronavirus to vulnerable small coastal communities.

If boating with another person ensure you maintain social distancing (at least 1.5 metres). Allowances are made for the supervision of children or similar needs that may require closer contact. Use hand sanitiser where there is contact with shared surfaces. If you are boating alone, ensure you tell someone where you are going, wear a kill switch cord and a life jacket.

For more information, see:

Can I go hunting?

Yes, but you must adhere to restrictions regarding travel, physical distancing, residing at your primary place of residence and gatherings. This means you may only go hunting with one other person (except for members of your household or members of a custody or guardianship arrangement). You should consider whether hunting is essential and whether personal exercise can be obtained from alternative activities.

For more information, see Hunting in Tasmania FAQs.

Can I play golf?

Yes, as long as you abide by the two person rule.

Organised golf tournaments or competitions are likely to present too great a risk of gatherings forming above the permitted maximum of two people. People, however, may choose to continue to play golf as a permitted form of exercise, provided this is done within the two-person rules. You should call ahead to find out if your usual golf course is still open and if they have taken any additional hygiene measures.

If undertaking golf as a form of exercise, you should observe social distancing from others at the course and be careful not to form groups. Use common sense at the golf course, reconsider your visit time if there are already a few people there and you can’t keep an appropriate distance.

Can I receive learner driver lessons?

Driver training is not currently prohibited from the restrictions put in place by the Tasmanian Government to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in the community and can therefore continue to operate lawfully.

A person cannot leave their primary residence without a reasonable excuse. A reasonable excuse includes travelling for the purpose of work where you cannot work from home, so driving instructors can leave their house for their work, which includes teaching people how to drive.

It is considered to be reasonable for a person to leave their house to receive driving lessons (either from a driving instructor or a member of their family), and we encourage people to drive within their local area. Learning to drive is a learning activity that cannot be done from home and is in line with the reasonable excuse of travelling to attend school or study where you cannot learn from home. Learner drivers could also continue to drive with a supervising family member for essential travel under the Public Health Order (eg driving to the supermarket for essential supplies).

Learner driving is exempt from the two-person gathering rule, if it is in a private vehicle. Learner driving is also exempt from the social distancing (1.5m) requirements, as it would be considered unsafe for the trainer/supervisor to sit in the backseat while the learner drives.

Can auctions and open home inspections take place?

Group inspections and in-person auctions are currently not permitted.

To help stop the spread of coronavirus, it is important that all businesses comply with their obligations to enforce social distancing and maintain good hygiene practices.

Private home inspections (of no more than three persons per inspection) are still permissible and can be organised with the listing agent.

Buyers can also inspect a home virtually and then if they wish to visit a property in person, they can arrange a private visit through the selling agent.

Auctions can continue to be held online. Prospective buyers can continue to register and bid online. Only ‘in-person’ auctions have been suspended due to social distancing rules.

How many people can attend a funeral?

The total number of people present at a funeral must not exceed 10 persons. This includes mourners and officiators. An infant, regardless of age, is a person to be included in the head count permitted at funerals. There is no exemption for additional family members to attend under exceptional circumstances.

Where safe and practicable, each person at a funeral must maintain a distance of no less than 1.5 metres between themselves and any other person, and the total number of persons present in any single undivided space, at the same time, must not exceed the one person per four square metre rule.

How many people can attend a wedding?

No more than five people and where the one person per four square metre rule applies.

Group gatherings/households

What is a household?

Members of your household are those who live permanently in the same home.

How many people can visit a home?

Remember that under the Direction, you must remain at your primary residence and you cannot visit another household for a ‘social visit.’ You can only visit another household for the reasons listed in the Direction, eg to provide compassionate care or to drop off essential supplies.

A maximum of two people from outside your household may visit your household at any one time. The visitors must not stay for longer than is necessary to carry out the essential purpose of the visit.

Can my partner (who lives separately to me) continue to visit and stay overnight?

This is permitted to continue if you are providing essential support to your partner, however, all parties must exercise common sense and a strong degree of caution.

If you are required to reside in a place other than your primary residence to provide essential support (ie stay overnight with your partner) the visit should not be for longer than necessary.

A suitable arrangement during this time may be for partners to remain in the same household for the time being, if this is possible. This is not required under the Direction but is given as an example of a way to manage risk and protect people who reside in both households.

Enforcement

How will the stay at home and gathering orders be enforced?

Police will be conducting patrols of places throughout the state, including beaches, camping areas and other public spaces. Police may stop you to ask about your reasons for being out of your primary residence to ensure it falls within one of the permitted reasons. A common sense approach will be taken to enforcing these orders and people are not required to carry special documentation or register their movements with Police.

I have information / concerns about non-compliance with self-isolation requirements or gathering restrictions

If you are concerned that a fellow Tasmanian is not complying with self-isolation or gathering restrictions, you can call the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738 or you can report it online.

Last update: 09 Apr 2020 2:33pm

Schedule 1 of the Direction under Section 16 of the Public Health Act (Gatherings)

Each of the premises listed in Schedule 1 must not open or be operated whilst the Direction is in force.

  1. All restaurants, cafes, food courts and workplace canteens, unless -
    1. the premises are being used to provide food or drink, or both, to be consumed at a location other than the premises; or
    2. the premises are being used to provide food or drink, or both, to employees, or contractors, within the premises and the food or drink is to be consumed at another location within the premises and each person at that location complies with paragraphs (g) and (h); or
    3. the premises are within a hospital, residential care home, homeless accommodation, school, prison, defence barracks or detention centre and the food or drink is to be consumed by the residents of those organisations.
  2. All premises where alcohol is sold for consumption at those premises (including pubs, registered and licensed clubs and hotels) other than such part of those premises lawfully operated -
    1. on 1 March 2020 and in relation to the sale of alcohol, wholly or predominantly to provide alcohol for consumption at a location other than the premises; or
    2. to provide alcohol, with food provided in accordance with item 1(a), for consumption at another premises.
  3. All hotels, motels, hostels, bed and breakfasts, boarding houses, caravan parks, campsites, camping areas, homeless accommodation and other similar premises, except in relation to -
    1. workers, or contractors, employed or engaged in the operation of such premises; and
    2. current residents of such premises who predominantly reside at the premises on a permanent basis; and
    3. current residents of such premises who predominantly reside at the premises while their principal residence is unavailable, whether it is unavailable on a permanent or temporary basis, including where the residence is unavailable due to a border closure, or travel restriction, preventing the resident from returning to the principal residence; and
    4. other current residents of such premises, up until 11.59 pm on 1 April 2020, unless the resident proves that the resident has booked travel on the first available flight or sailing after 11.59 pm on 1 April 2020; and
    5. residents of such premises, who are residents -
      1. for the purposes of self-isolation or quarantine; or
      2. while another person is using the resident's principal residence for self-isolation or quarantine; and
    6. residents of such premises who are residing at the premises due to the person performing duties that make the person a specified person under -
      1. the direction given in respect of the disease by the Director of Public Health on 20 March 2020 under section 16 of the Act; or
      2. such other direction, given by the Director of Public Health under section 16 of the Act in respect of the disease, that may replace the direction specified in subparagraph (i); and
    7. residents of such premises who -
      1. are residing at the premises for the purpose of employment or for compassionate reasons, including where the person requires emergency accommodation due to an emergency, family violence or vulnerability; and
      2. have only travelled within Tasmania to get to the premises.
  4. All residential rehabilitation premises that are providing treatment for addiction or mental health, except in relation to -
    1. operators, or workers or contractors, employed or engaged in the operation of such premises; and
    2. residents of such premises.
  5. All places of worship, religious gatherings, religious premises, and other similar premises, unless those premises are being operated -
    1. to perform a wedding, where -
      1. the total number of people present at the wedding does not exceed 5 persons; and
      2. each person on the premises at the time the wedding is performed complies with paragraphs (g) and (h); or
    2. to perform a funeral, where -
      1. the total number of people present at the funeral does not exceed 10 persons; and
      2. each person on the premises at the time the funeral is performed complies with paragraphs (g) and (h).
  6. All cinemas, entertainment venues, casinos, gaming or other gambling venues, dance venues, night clubs, strip clubs, brothels and other similar premises.
  7. All galleries, museums, national institutions, historic sites and other similar premises.
  8. All concert venues, theatres, arenas, auditoriums, stadiums and other similar premises, unless used by performers for the purpose of live streaming and the persons in, or on, those premises during the live stream -
    1. do not exceed 5 persons; and
    2. comply with the requirements of paragraphs (g) and (h) while in, or on, the premises.
  9. All amusement parks, arcades, play centres, skate parks, playgrounds and other similar premises, regardless of whether the premises are an indoor space or an outdoor space.
  10. All auction houses, including premises where auction items are available for inspection, other than premises used for the sale of livestock, food or other agricultural purposes.
  11. All premises, other than newsagencies, where racing, gaming or gambling services are provided.
  12. All spas and massage parlours and other similar premises.
  13. All indoor and outdoor swimming pools, gymnasiums, health clubs, fitness centres, wellness centres (including yoga and barre premises), indoor venues used for sport or fitness, saunas, bath houses and other similar premises or venues, other than such part of the premises or venue used to provide physical rehabilitation services if -
    1. the rehabilitation services are provided by, or under the direction of -
      1. a registered health practitioner within the meaning of the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (Tasmania); or
      2. a person who holds accreditation, as an accredited exercise physiologist, with Exercise and Sports Science Australia Ltd (ABN 14 053 849 460); and
    2. each person in that part of the premises complies with the requirements of paragraphs (g) and (h).
  14. All community centres, neighbourhood houses, recreation centres, youth centres, community facilities, libraries and other similar premises, unless the premises are being used to provide essential voluntary, or public, services such as food banks or homelessness services.
  15. All premises, and all parts of premises, owned or operated by a council of a municipal area if those premises, or parts of premises, do not provide essential voluntary, or public, services.
  16. All zoos, wildlife centres, animal parks, petting zoos, aquariums, marine parks or similar premises, except -
    1. in relation to operators, or workers or contractors, employed or engaged in the care or treatment of animals at the facility, performing an animal rescue function or the general operation of such premises; and
    2. for the purposes of producing food or stock.

Last update: 09 Apr 2020 2:33pm

Schedule 2 of the Direction under Section 16 of the Public Health Act (Gatherings)

Each of the premises and activities listed in Schedule 2 must not open or be operated whilst the Direction is in force.

  1. Subject to item 2 in this Schedule, the provision of religious gatherings, religious ceremonies, religious instruction, non-denominational ceremonies and other similar services and ceremonies, unless the services are lawfully provided remotely by electronic means.
  2. The provision of wedding and funeral ceremonies and services -
    1. unless -
      1. in the case of a wedding, the total number of persons present does not exceed 5 persons; and
      2. in the case of a funeral, the total number of persons present does not exceed 10 persons; and
      3. in all cases, each person present complies with paragraphs (g) and (h); or
    2. unless the services are lawfully provided remotely by electronic means.
  3. The provision of beauty therapy, tanning, waxing, manicure or other nail treatments, tattoos, ear and body piercing, body modification and other similar services.
  4. The provision of real estate auctions and open home inspections, or other similar services, other than private home inspections of no more than 3 persons per inspection, unless the services are lawfully provided remotely by electronic means.
  5. The provision of markets, whether held in an indoor space or an outdoor space, unless -
    1. the market is only for the provision of fresh food, or produce, that is to be consumed at other locations or premises; and
    2. the requirements of paragraphs (g) and (h) are complied with while the market is being provided.
  6. The provision of boot camps, personal training and other exercise services, whether provided in an indoor space or an outdoor space -
    1. unless -
      1. the services are being provided in an outdoor space; and
      2. the requirements of paragraphs (c), (g) and (h) are complied with while the service is being provided; or
    2. unless the services are lawfully provided remotely by electronic means.
  7. The provision of social sports activities, or other exercise or activity-based gatherings, whether provided in an indoor space or an outdoor space, unless the services are lawfully provided remotely by electronic means.
  8. The provision of garage sales, or other mass selling of second hand goods, at any premises, other than the selling of second-hand goods by a charitable organisation.
  9. The provision of services to a person by a sex worker, within the meaning of the Sex Industry Offences Act 2005.

Last update: 08 Apr 2020 1:40pm

What procedures should I put in place when launching my boat?

Ensure you wait your turn at the ramp. MAST recommends that if it is a double lane facility that only one lane is used to maintain the required social distance. These same procedures apply when retrieving your boat. Maintain good personal hygiene and social distancing at all times.

Are there restriction on where I can go boating?

Restrictions on where recreational boaters may launch from will be in place this holiday period.

If you own a boat you will be restricted to launching within the municipality within which your primary residential address is listed for the purposes of the stay at home restrictions.

These restrictions will be in place from Wednesday 8 April until Monday 27 April 2020 and will be reviewed to determine if an extension is required.

You will not be able to take your boat to a coastal community to launch that boat if it is outside of the municipality in which your primary residence is in.

You can find a list of boat ramps in your municipality on the MAST website.

Am I able to buy fuel for my boat and other essentials?

Yes, you are able to buy fuel. As long as the business is not a prohibited venue or service you may continue to use it.

Can I stay overnight on my larger cruising boat?

Only if it is your primary residence and you have elected to stay there from 11:59pm on 30 March 2020

Can I carry out essential maintenance on my boat?

Yes, but if the boat is in a marina please check with the marina manager for conditions that may apply.

Will MAST owned facilities remain open?

Yes, unless MAST is requested to close these facilities.

Are MAST BoatSafe Partners open for business?

Please check directly with your preferred dealer/retailer.

Last update: 07 Apr 2020 1:45pm

What are the restrictions on where I can go hunting?

All reserved land is closed. Similarly there is no public access to land and water managed by Hydro Tasmania and Sustainable Timber Tasmania.

Many private farms have closed or restricted access. Permission should be sought from the landholder before entering private properties.

Where can I find information about hunting restrictions?

Contact individual landholders about private land.

You can also visit the following websites:

How far can I travel in order to hunt?

You must return to your primary place of residence the same day you depart to go hunting.  Staying at shacks or camping is not permitted.

Can I go camping as part of my recreational hunting and fishing activity?

No, parks, reserves and campgrounds are closed. You must return to your primary residence the same day.

How many people can I go hunting with?

A rule of 2 persons applies to all gatherings, except for gatherings of household members or members of a custody or guardianship arrangement.

What procedures should I put in place when I go hunting?

You should first consider if hunting is essential.

Check with the landholder to determine whether you can access the land and what precautions the landholder may want you to take while on their property.

Hunters should maintain personal hygiene practices such as washing hands or using an alcohol-based hand sanitiser, as well as coughing or sneezing into a tissue or flexed elbow if a tissue is not available, and staying at least 1.5 metres apart.

Avoid stopping at places such as retail or hospitality outlets and public toilets on the way to and from the hunting location if possible.

Am I able to buy equipment/things I need to go hunting/fuel for my boat and other essentials?

Yes, as long as the business is not a prohibited venue or service.

Can I go muttonbirding?

The muttonbird season is open from 4 to 19 April 2020 but almost all muttonbird rookeries are on reserved land that is now closed to public access.  Some private landowners whose properties muttonbird rookeries occur have restricted access to those properties to protect the health of their families and employees.

Where can I go muttonbirding?

Almost all muttonbird rookeries occur on reserved land that can no longer be accessed.  Some private landowners, on whose properties muttonbird rookeries occur, have restricted access to those properties to protect the health of their families and employees.

Access to any property must be sought from the landowner.

What game seasons are open?

All game seasons are open.

Seasons are currently open on wild deer, wild duck and muttonbird. However hunters must observe any restrictions on access to the land on which they wish to hunt.

Will I receive a refund for my Game Licence?

No refunds will be given for deer, duck and wallaby Game Licences as these seasons have already commenced.

Information about muttonbird licences will be updated over coming days. Go to the Recreational Game Licences webpage for updates.

As a landholder, can I still take browsing wildlife under a Crop Protection Permit?

Landholders can still take browsing wildlife if they hold the appropriate Crop Protection Permits.

As a landholder, who can I engage to assist in the management of browsing wildlife?

Landholders can engage licensed and authorised employees and hunters.  You should consider how to manage the risk of introducing coronavirus to the property by all visitors.

Last update: 08 Apr 2020 2:30pm

Where to find information

The Department of Education website and Facebook page are being updated regularly with alerts and advice for schools, libraries and child and family centres.

For school related COVID-19 information you can also contact the Department of Education on 1800 816 057 (9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday).

Term 2 plan (as at 6 April 2020)

The intention is to continue operating in mixed and online modes:

 Tasmanian Government SchoolsCatholic EducationIndependent Schools
6-9 AprilProfessional Learning (Student free)Professional Learning (Student free)Last week of Term 1
Monday 27 AprilProfessional Learning (Student free)Term 2 commencesTerm 2 commences
Tuesday 28 AprilTerm 2 underway for all schools

Enquiries

Tasmanian Government schools

Tasmanian Government school students will finish for the Easter break on Friday 3 April.

Teachers will stay at school between 6-9 April to undertake professional learning and prepare at-home learning materials for Term 2.

Term 2 will now commence on Tuesday 28th April for students. Monday 27th April will be a student-free teacher preparation day for school staff to allow them to adapt their planning to whatever the current COVID 19 situation may be at that time.

The intention for Term 2 is for students to continue to learn at home where possible, with teachers leading this learning.

Each week, teachers will provide an overview to parents of what the student’s days should entail and will provide activities to support their learning. These activities will align with the current Australian Curriculum and may be online, offline or a combination of both. Teachers will be in regular contact with students.

Government schools will still remain open for those students who are unable to be supported/supervised at home.

This situation will be regularly reviewed based on Public Health advice and updates.

See this media release for more information.

School closures

The Australian Health Protection Principal Committee has considered school closures and recommended schools remain open. The Committee’s advice is that pre-emptive closures are not likely to be proportionate or effective as a public health intervention to prevent community transmission of COVID-19 at this time.

Globally, nearly all children who have been known to be infected with COVID-19 have had mild illness.

Closing schools may inadvertently place older people at increased risk (if they are caring for children on behalf of parents), would make it harder to maintain social distancing measures among children and young people, and would have a major impact on the health workforce.

Our response to COVID-19 is likely to continue for six or more months. Closing schools for six months is not feasible or warranted given what we currently know.

Individual, short-term school closures may be considered if there is a surge of illness in localised areas.

The Tasmanian Government has committed to re-open schools at the end of the school break, subject to the advice of the Australian Health Principal Protection Committee.

More information is available in this letter.

Should I send my child to school

Parents are encouraged to keep their children at home. No penalties will be applied for students not attending school, and parents should advise their school if their child is learning from home.

Government schools will remain open for those who are unable to provide care for their children due to work commitments, or if they are unable to support their child's learning at home.

Where possible, Government schools will begin to provide resources for learning at home for their students. Ideas for parents to support their child’s learning is available on the Department of Education Learning at Home page.

Children should not attend school or childcare if:

  • they are unwell with fever OR acute respiratory illness (eg cough, sore throat, shortness of breath)
  • they meet the criteria for self-isolation.

Cancellation of school gatherings

The Tasmanian Government has introduced precautionary measures to limit the impact of COVID-19 in schools. Schools have adopted social distancing measures, including the cancellation of:

  • assemblies and presentation nights
  • excursions
  • travel
  • fetes and fairs
  • concerts (with audiences)
  • all sports carnivals
  • school camps (both local and interstate)
  • face-to-face parent teacher meetings.

These restrictions will be in place until further notice.

Education levy relief

Government School levies for 2020 will be reimbursed. Many of the activities that are funded by school levies are no longer occurring at this stage.

Parents and carers do not need to contact their children’s school, as the process will be managed centrally, and the Department of Education will be putting in place processes to have refunds made within 8 weeks.

If levy payments have not yet been made by parents and carers they will not be required to do so.

What vacation care services are available for 6-9 April and Easter Holidays 2020

Available vacation care services can be found on the Starting Blocks or Child Care Finder websites.

Parents and carers need to be aware that in these uncertain times, services are adapting their schedules to address enrolment and staffing matters. Therefore, services may be different to previous practice. Web-based information will be updated regularly.

Parents and carers should make contact directly with the service to arrange enrolments for their children, fee payments and to clarify current information eg cancellation polices.

Alternatively, parents and carers can contact Government schools who may be able to assist with information about services being offered close to, or at the school.

Childcare fees

The Australian Government has announced major changes to support education and care services to remain open.

Services that remain open will now receive a weekly payment to ensure they can deliver early childhood education and care to families who need it. Families will not incur any cost.  This will also mean that families can still keep their child enrolled at childcare whether they attend or not.  If they do not attend due to COVID-19 they will retain their place at no cost.

The aim is to support services to remain open to ensure that quality education and care continues to be available to support essential workers and vulnerable children.

All services are working through these changes and will be in contact with  families.

This change will apply retrospectively from 23 March 2020 and will continue until 30 June 2020.

See the media release for more details.

Resources

Last update: 08 Apr 2020 2:33pm

Don't be afraid to discuss the coronavirus

  • Most children will have already heard about the virus or seen people wearing face masks. Parents shouldn’t avoid talking about it.
  • Not talking about something can actually make children worry more. Look at the conversation as an opportunity to convey the facts and set the emotional tone. Try to help your child feel informed by giving them fact-based information. This is likely more reassuring than whatever they’re hearing from other sources.

Be appropriate

  • Don’t volunteer too much information, as this may be overwhelming. Instead, try to answer your child’s questions.
  • Do your best to answer honestly and clearly. It’s okay if you can’t answer everything; being available to your child is what matters

Take your cues from you child

  • Invite your child to tell you anything they may have heard about the coronavirus, and how they feel.
  • Give them ample opportunity to ask questions. Be prepared to answer (but not prompt) questions. Your goal is to avoid encouraging frightening fantasies.

Deal with your own anxiety

  • If you are feeling anxious or panicked. This isn’t the time to talk to your children about what’s happening with the coronavirus.
  • If you notice that you are feeling anxious. Take some time to calm down before trying to have a conversation or answer your child’s questions.

Be reassuring

  • Children can be egocentric. Hearing about the coronavirus on the news may be enough to make them seriously worry that they’ll catch it.
  • It is helpful to reassure your child about how rare the coronavirus is (the flu is much more common). Reassure them that children actually seem to have milder symptoms.

Focus on what you're doing to stay safe

  • An important way to reassure children is to emphasise the safety precautions you are taking.
  • Children feel empowered when they know what to do to keep themselves safe.
  • The coronavirus is transmitted mostly by coughing and touching surfaces.
  • The CDC recommends thoroughly washing your hands as the primary means of staying healthy.
  • Remind children that they are taking care of themselves by washing their hands with soap and water for 20 seconds (or the length of two “Happy Birthday” songs). This is important when they come in from outside, before they eat, and after blowing their nose, coughing, sneezing or using the bathroom.
  • If children ask about face masks, explain that the experts at the CDC say they aren’t necessary for most people.
  • If children see people wearing face masks. Explain that those people are being extra cautious.

Stick to routine

  • Staying grounded in routines and predictability is going to be helpful right now.
  • This is particularly important if your child’s school or child care shuts down.
  • Make sure you are taking care of the basics just like you would during school holidays.
  • Structured days with regular mealtimes and bedtimes are an essential part of keeping children happy and healthy.

Keep talking

  • Tell children that you will continue to keep them updated as you learn more.
  • Let them know that the lines of communication are going to be open. You can say, ‘Even though we don’t have the answers to everything right now, know that once we know more, Mum or Dad will let you know, too’

Last update: 08 Apr 2020 2:37pm

Residential tenancy changes during covid-19 emergency period

Changes have been made to residential tenancies in Tasmania under the COVID-19 Disease (Emergency Provisions) Act 2020.

The changes detailed below will now apply.

Temporary suspension of evictions

Under the changes, tenants living at their rental property cannot be evicted by their landlords for rent arrears or for the expiry of their lease until at least 30 June 2020.

This applies to a notice to vacate which has been issued to a tenant, where the tenant is yet to vacate, except:

  • By agreement with the tenant; or
  • if it is a non-fixed term tenancy and the notice to vacate has been served prior to 3 April 2020 because the property is to be sold; or
  • where the notice to vacate has been served due to the tenant using the property for unlawful purpose; or
  • in the circumstance where it is terminated for severe hardship by the Residential Tenancy Commissioner.

An owner or tenant can also apply to the Magistrates Court of Tasmania to terminate the agreement for damage caused by wilful or unlawful behaviour or violence.

Tenants need to continue to pay rent during this period where possible. If you cannot pay rent as usual due to a change in your financial circumstances, you should talk to the property owner/property manager about your circumstances and, in the first instance, ask them for a temporary reduction in rent.

Notice to Vacate can still be issued before 30 June 2020, but they will have no effect until after this date. This measure will be reviewed and may be extended.

Other measures put in place during the emergency period

The Act changes parts of the Residential Tenancy Act 1997 for an emergency period. The emergency period exists for 120 days from the date the Act commences with the ability for the Minister to extend the period by 90 days at a time.

Reducing rent by mutual agreement

During the emergency period owners and tenants can come to an agreement to reduce the rent. This agreement should to be:

  • in writing and;
  • signed by both parties

Any agreement will be taken to form part of the residential tenancy agreement.

Breaking a lease due to severe hardship

Tenants or owners can apply to break a fixed term lease if its continuation would cause severe hardship.

Parties can apply to the Residential Tenancy Commissioner (the Commissioner) for an Order to terminate the agreement in the case of severe COVID-19 related hardship.

This option should be seen as a last resort.  It is best to maintain a positive relationship between owners and tenants. The best way to do this is for owners and tenants to discuss their concerns.

To find out more about applying for an Order, visit our website www.cbos.tas.gov.au

The Commissioner may make an Order as to whether the continuation of the agreement would cause severe hardship. Once the Commissioner has made a decision, either party has seven days to lodge an appeal with the Magistrates Court of Tasmania.

An Order will take effect on the day after the end of the seven day appeal period.

An Order may specify compensation payable by the owner or tenant. If compensation is awarded, it would weigh up the parties' circumstances and make an Order based on the rights and burdens of each party.

Delay to evictions specifically due to rent in arrears

This amendment is in place for the emergency period (120 days) and is separate to the Notice issued by the Minister to suspend all notices to vacate for a 90 day period.

There is a suspension of evictions specifically relating to rent in arrears. This means during the emergency period:

  • an owner will not be able to issue a notice to vacate for rent in arrears;
  • a notice to vacate given before the emergency period begins will have no effect if the tenant has not yet vacated.

This will suspend all evictions due to rent arrears, including those currently before the courts.

At the end of the emergency period, owners will be able to issue a notice to vacate and recover the rent in arrears, if the tenant is still in breach of their agreement, in the normal way. Owners will be able to recover any outstanding rent from the tenant's bond or, in the event the amount exceeds the Bond, through civil proceedings, just as they are able to do now.

Suspension of general repairs and maintenance

During the emergency period general repairs and maintenance will not be required to be done.

There is no change to requirements for emergency or urgent repairs as these are necessary to ensure the health and safety of tenants.

Limiting of property inspections and repairs

Under these circumstances, the government has made changes to ensure the limiting of property inspections and certain repairs being undertaken during this period.

'Right of entry' to a residential tenancy has changed during the emergency period. During this period, an owner or their agent can only undertake inspections when:

  • it is reasonably believed that the tenant is ill, injured or unable to give permission;
  • denial of immediate access is likely to result in damage to all or part of the premises;
  • there is a risk to the tenant or another person present on the premises;
  • damage has occurred to the premises;
  • with 24 hours' notice to the tenant, to ensure that repairs have been appropriately carried out.

All remaining right of entry clauses do not apply during the emergency period. This does not prevent inspection by an owner or their agent where it is agreed by the tenant.

Before undertaking any allowed inspection during the emergency period, agents and owners should consider all current health advice and social distancing requirements, including those to stop open homes and reduce the number of people present at one time.

Responsibility of tenants for cleanliness or damage

Tenants are to keep a premises in a reasonable state of cleanliness during the tenancy.

During the emergency period a tenant is taken not to have failed to comply with this clause, if they cannot meet this requirement due to COVID-19.

For example, if a tenant is moving out of a property and is unable to get a commercial company to clean the carpets because of lockdown restrictions in place, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Tenants or landlords who need further advice can visit Consumer, Building and Occupational Services or call 1300 555 727.

For the purposes of this information, a residential tenancy is defined as a premises, and land (where applicable), that is leased to a tenant for the purpose of providing a place of residence to that tenant. This includes boarding premises.

Last update: 08 Apr 2020 2:38pm

Metro Tasmania

Metro Tasmania are reducing cash transactions on board. Greencards are free from 26 March, and travel will be free from Thursday 26 March until Sunday 31 May 2020 (extended from Friday 10 April) to give people time to get a free Greencard.

Metro Tasmania has implemented an enhanced cleaning regime of its bus fleet by its contractor, with hospital grade disinfectant in use and particular attention being paid to frequently touched surfaces.

More information is available on the Metro Tasmania website.

School buses

Advice on school bus cleaning has been circulated to all contracted school bus operators in the state with new requirements for more regular cleaning of bus interiors.

Community transport

Community transport services such as those provided by many local councils and NGO’s to support access to medical care and other essential services can continue. Minimise the number of people in a car or bus to ensure social distancing can be maintained.

Last update: 08 Apr 2020 2:40pm

Supported accommodation for people with disability in Tasmania

The Australian Government has released national guidelines for the prevention, control and public health management of COVID-19 outbreaks in residential care facilities in Australia. These guidelines should be referred to for the prevention and management of outbreaks in Tasmania's accommodation for people with disability (supported accommodation) where residents sleep, eat and live either temporarily or on an ongoing basis. This includes NDIS Supported Disability Accommodation (SDA).

This page provides targeted advice regarding the Tasmanian Support Measures & Stimulus Package, in particular the emergency accommodation support included in this package. It also provides targeted guidelines for disability accommodation facilities in Tasmania.

NDIS Providers should refer to the NDIS website and the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission for COVID-19 advice regarding supporting participants and providers.

Tasmanian support measures and stimulus package

To be read in conjunction with national guidelines for residential care facilities.

Accommodation support for frontline workers

Emergency accommodation will be available for frontline workers if they need to stay away from home, in circumstances where their family members are ill.

Disability Support Workers are eligible for this form of assistance.

For workers of disability accommodation, this means that emergency accommodation support will be available by contacting the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738 if it is demonstrated that they are at risk of infection if they reside at their family home.

Accommodation support for vulnerable Tasmanians

Emergency accommodation will be available for low-income individuals and families who have been placed in isolation but who are unable to return to their regular place of residence.

For residents of disability accommodation, this means that emergency accommodation will be available by contacting the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738 if it is demonstrated that isolation from other residents who are at high risk within the facility cannot be reasonably achieved.

Isolation assistance

For isolated residents of disability accommodation this includes:

  • Emergency Relief with the provision of emergency food hampers, delivery of medications, financial counselling and other essential support from partner organisations such as Red Cross, Rural Business Tasmania and The Salvation Army
  • Pandemic Isolation Assistance Grants for vulnerable Tasmanians with the provision of one-off payment.

These forms of assistance can be accessed by phoning the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738.

Emergency Relief

The provision of emergency food hampers, delivery of medications, financial counselling and other essential support from Recovery Network Partner organisations for persons who are required by Public Health to self-isolate due to COVID-19 risk.

Recovery Network Partners include Red Cross, Rural Business Tasmania and The Salvation Army.

For residents of disability accommodation this means that emergency relief assistance for isolated residents will be available where there is demonstrated need that the facility requires this form of assistance by contacting the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738. Eligibility for these payments does not require residents to transfer to alternative accommodation. Public Health will provide an appropriate referral.

Pandemic Isolation Assistance Grants for Vulnerable Tasmanians

Pandemic Isolation Assistance Grants for vulnerable Tasmanians (also known as Emergency Relief Payments) – one-off payments will be made to low-income persons who are required by Public Health to self-isolate due to COVID-19 risk.

For residents of disability accommodation, this means that one-off relief payments for isolated residents will be available by contacting the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738. Eligibility for these payments does not require residents to transfer to alternative accommodation.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Disability Service Providers are advised to follow the information provided on the Australian Government Department of Health website.

Disability Support Workers

Disability Support Workers include workers in Tasmania’s disability accommodation facilities. These workers will be considered as frontline workers who may be eligible for Accommodation Support under the Tasmanian Support Measures & Stimulus Package.

Emergency Accommodation for Isolation

Emergency accommodation for isolation is available under the Tasmanian Support Measures & Stimulus Package and can be accessed by phoning the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738 (see information on Accommodation support for vulnerable Tasmanians).

This is in addition to the Emergency Relief and Pandemic Isolation Assistance Grants which are also available to residents of disability accommodation if they are transferred for isolation to alternative emergency accommodation.

NDIS Participants

Participants should contact the NDIA on 1800 800 110 if they need to talk to a planner, make changes to their plan or are having trouble sourcing services due to COVID-19.

More information about COVID-19 for NDIS participants and their families and carers is available on the NDIS website.

For further information related to Disability Accommodation and COVID-19 in Tasmania, contact the Public Health hotline on 1800 671 738.

Last update: 09 Apr 2020 4:22pm

Your rights and responsibilities

Discrimination is against the law in Tasmania in a number of areas, including:

  • Employment (paid and unpaid work)
  • Providing goods and services
  • Education (schools and universities)
  • Accommodation, including rentals

Your rights during the pandemic

During the pandemic, and various shutdowns, you have the right to live and work in a discrimination and harassment free environment.

You have the right not to be discriminated against because of your race, disability, family responsibilities and a number of other grounds.

Disability includes any medical condition, including coronavirus (COVID-19).

It is also against the law to treat someone less favourably because you think that they have coronavirus.

Examples of unlawful discrimination and prohibited conduct

  • Making racist comments towards people because of their race. Race includes a person’s skin colour, nationality, ethnic background and immigrant status.
  • Requiring employees to undergo a test for coronavirus, when they do not meet the current testing criteria (have returned from overseas travel, disembarked from a cruise ship or had close contact with a confirmed case).
  • Reducing someone’s hours or terminating someone’s employment because they have coronavirus, or are caring for a child or relative who is in isolation, or who has coronavirus.
  • Refusing to rent a property to someone because of their race, or because they have coronavirus.
  • Cancelling a rental contract/agreement because you think someone may get coronavirus because that person is a nurse, doctor or health care worker.
  • Refusing to serve a customer because of their race, or because they are wearing a mask.
  • Depending on medical advice, not allowing an employee to work from home who is older or is vulnerable to coronavirus because of their health or because they are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

Your responsibilities during the pandemic

  • You have a responsibility to follow all the latest public health advice and laws related to managing the pandemic.
  • You have a responsibility not to discriminate, engage in offensive, humiliating, insulting, intimidating or ridiculing conduct, or incite hatred towards people because of their race or presumed disability (including if you think they have coronavirus).

If you have any questions or would like to lodge a complaint, please contact Equal Opportunity Tasmania on 6165 7515 or 1300 305 062 or e-mail office@equalopportunity.tas.gov.au

Last update: 08 Apr 2020 2:41pm

Lifeblood Donor Centres

Lifeblood Donor Centres is one of the essential services that will remain open along with supermarkets, pharmacies, banks, etc to provide life-saving blood and plasma to Australian patients.

To book a donation visit www.lifeblood.com.au, call 13 14 95 or download the Donate Blood app.

Last update: 08 Apr 2020 2:43pm

At present, because of the social distancing requirements in place as a result of COVID-19, a significant number of Justices of the Peace are no longer undertaking their duties.

The Department of Justice supports the decision of any Justice to take this course of action, given that a number of Justices are older members of the community and may be susceptible to an increased risk of contracting the virus. Justices have limited premises from which they can provide services and in those circumstances, it is not considered appropriate for members of the public to visit Justices at their residences.

Notwithstanding this, a small number of Justices are continuing to provide services. A list of all Justices can be found on the Department of Justice website.

Please consider whether your document is essential and must be sworn urgently. If it does not need to be done now please consider waiting until the situation improves.

In the event that a Justice is urgently required, it is recommended that you phone Justices in your area to ask whether they are willing to deal with your matter.

Before contacting a Justice, please carefully read the document to see whether a Justice is in fact required. Many of the duties of a Justice can also be undertaken by a Commissioner for Declarations who can:

  • witness signatures to documents;
  • certify a true copy of an original document; and
  • take statutory declarations.

Commissioners for Declarations include:

  • accountants;
  • bank, building society or credit union officers with 5 or more continuous years of service;
  • dentists;
  • nurses;
  • optometrists;
  • permanent Commonwealth, State or a Local Government employees with 5 or more continuous years of service;
  • pharmacists;
  • Police officers; and
  • full-time teachers.

More details about Commissioners for Declarations can be found on the Department of Justice website.

Arrangements are being put in place to allow for electronic witnessing/certifying/taking of statutory declarations. Further details will be published as soon as they become available.

Last update: 09 Apr 2020 9:49am

Easter in Tasmania will be different this year.

The current restrictions that are necessary to stop the spread of COVID-19 mean that many of the activities that we traditionally enjoy over the Easter break will not be possible. We won’t be going on trips in the car or on the boat outside our municipalities and there will be no travelling to shacks or visiting a favourite camping spot.

But this doesn’t mean we can’t still have fun, responsibly! We can keep our communities safe and enjoy the Easter break by following these simple measures:

  • Keep it local
  • Keep it to one or two
  • Keep it connected

There are lots of activities we can take part in to make this Easter a special time:

  • You can still organise an Easter egg hunt in the backyard for your kids.
  • There’s lots of online Easter craft ideas to get everyone in the family creative.
  • You can still go on a bike ride, take the dog for a walk, do yoga in your backyard or take your horse out on the trail. Just remember – limited to 2 people.
  • Show off your ‘Kitchen Rules’ skills by organising a digital dinner party with friends and family. Make it a bake-off and share snaps or videos of your latest creations.
  • Watch a live streaming of church services over the Easter period.
  • Take your social life online! Chat on the phone with grandparents, swap jokes with your siblings, share a digital drink with a friend. The sky is the limit in a digitally connected world.

If you are looking for a great Easter gift, why not send your loved ones a gift card for their favourite shop, restaurant or spa. It will give them something to look forward to in the future and help support local businesses.

Make sure to plan ahead:

Let’s also think ahead about what we will need over the Easter weekend, so that you minimise trips out of the house.

Don’t leave it to the last minute to buy Easter eggs and fish. Continue to practice social distancing while you are out shopping for essential supplies.

Major supermarkets like Coles and Woolworths will be open in the lead up to and throughout the Easter weekend (except for Good Friday) so you don’t need to worry about getting what you need.

And if you do go down to the fish punts to get takeaway fish over the Easter weekend, don’t go as a whole family; just send one person.

These restrictions are difficult, but they are necessary to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and to save lives.

Services available over the Easter period (Friday 10 April to Monday 13 April 2020):

Live streaming of Easter Church Services
Banks Closed
Major supermarkets (Coles & Woolworths) Normal trading hours (Closed Good Friday)
Bottle shops Check locally
Australia Post No deliveries and post offices closed
Service Tasmania Closed (Friday 10 April to Tuesday 14 April)
Petrol stations Check locally
Metro Tasmania Check timetables
Local Government office hours Closed
Kerbside recycling and garbage collection Normal (check locally for smaller council areas)
Vet services Contact own Vet
RSPCA Tasmania Call 1300 139 947
Family Violence Counselling and Support Service Call 1800 608 122
Housing Tasmania Call 1300 665 663
Lifeline Call 131 144
Beyond Blue Call 1300 22 4636
TasNetworks (Fault Centre 24/7) Call 132 004
TasWater (Faults & Emergencies) Call 136 992
Centrelink offices and call centre

Closed

You can use your Centrelink online account through myGov to:

Tasmanian National Parks and reserves Closed
CampgroundsClosed
Caravan parksClosed
Food markets Check locally
Ubet betting shopfronts (TAB agencies) Closed
Cafes/restaurants Closed (excepting takeaway service and home delivery)